FERAL DOGS

Jeffrey S. GreenFeral dogs (Canis familiaris) Figure 1.
Assistant Regional Director
USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services
Lakewood, Colorado 80228

Philip S. Gipson
Unit Leader
Kansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
Kansas State University
Manhattan, KS 66506-3501

Fig. 1. Feral dog, Canis familiaris

 

Damage Prevention and Control Methods

Exclusion

Net wire fences.

Electric fences.

Frightening

Yard lights, effigies, pyrotechnics.

Electronic Guard.

Livestock guarding animals.

Repellents

Several products are registered but are practical for only small areas.

Capsaicin and anise oil may protect humans from attack by dogs.

Toxicants

Sodium cyanide in M-44 ejector devices.

Fumigants

None are registerd.

Trapping

Cage and Box traps.

No. 3 or 4 steel foothold traps.

Cable neck snares.

Shooting

Hunting from the air.

Hunting from the ground.

Other Methods

Eliminate food supplies.

Destroy dens.

Catch poles.

Jab sticks.

Cultural Considerations

Public education.

Dog control laws.

Professional carnivore damage control specialists.

Editors

Scott E. Hygnstrom; Robert M. Timm; Gary E. Larson

Prevention and Control of Wildlife Damage Logo 1994

PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF WILDLIFE DAMAGE — 1994

Cooperative Extension Division Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Nebraska -Lincoln

United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Animal Damage Control

Great Plains Agricultural Council Wildlife Committee

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