BOBCATS (Lynx rufus)

Dallas Virchow Fig. 1. Bobcat, Lynx rufus
Extension Assistant-Wildlife Damage Control
School of Natural Resources
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, Nebraska 68583-0974

Denny Hogeland
District Director
Nebraska Fur Harvesters
Bridgeport, Nebraska 69336

Additional Bobcat Control Control Information

Damage Prevention and Control Methods

Exclusion

Fence poultry and other small livestock located near human residence. 

Cultural Methods

Clear brush and timer in and around farmsteads and between large expanses of bobcat habitat and farmsteads.

Frightening

Place flashing white lights, loud music, or dogs with livestock.

Repellents

None are registered.

Toxicants

None are registered.

Fumigants

None are registered.

Trapping

Fur trappers may be willing to trap and remove bobcats year-round in problem situations in exchange for trapping rights when pelts are prime.

Steel foothold traps (No. 2, preferably No. 3 offset or No. 4 offset or padded).

Cage traps, 15x15x40 inches (38x38x100 cm) up to 24x24x48 inches (60x60x120 cm).

Large body-gripping traps (Victor® No. 330 Conibear®) in "cubby" sets.

Kill snares (1/16- or 5/64-inch steel [0.15- or 0.2-cm] cable, 6 to 8 feet [1.9 to 2.5 m] long).

Live snares (also known as cable-restraints) (3/32-inch [0.25-cm] steel cable, 6 to 8 feet [1.9 to 2.6 m] long) with protective clothing and equipment.

Shooting

Predator calls, experienced trail hounds, and centerfire rifles. 

Editors

Scott E. Hygnstrom; Robert M. Timm; Gary E. Larson

Prevention and Control of Wildlife Damage 1994 Logo

PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF WILDLIFE DAMAGE 1994

Cooperative Extension Division Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Nebraska -Lincoln

United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Animal Damage Control

Great Plains Agricultural Council Wildlife Committee

 

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