WATERFOWL

Edward C. Cleary Fig. 1. Cliff swallow (Hirundo pyrrhonota) with nests on a building.
Assistant State Director
USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services
Sandusky, Ohio 44870

Fig. 1.  Geese, ducks, and other waterfowl may damage crops by feeding in fields.

Damage Prevention and Control Methods

Habitat Modification

Vertically straighten pond banks. Allow ponds to freeze in winter.

Eliminate vegetation (nesting/escape cover) in and around ponds.

Reduce or eliminate fertilizer use around ponds.

Exclusion

Install fence around ponds, gardens, and yards.

Install overhead grids or netting on ponds, reservoirs, and fish raceways.

Cultural Methods

Change the timing of planting and harvesting of vulnerable crops.

Produce winter grains instead of spring grains.

Use grain dryers to allow earlier harvest of high-moisture grain.

Plant crops uniformly in spring.

Delay fall plowing as long as possible.

Use less-preferred plant species in parks, cemeteries, and lawns.

Plant trees and shrubs to block flight path.

Provide lure crops.

Field baiting.

Frightening

Flags.

Mylar tape.

Balloons.

Scarecrows.

Water spray devices.

Automatic exploders.

Pyrotechnics.

Recorded distress calls.

Dogs.

Live Capture

Walk-in funnel trap.

Rocket/cannon nets.

Spring-powered nets.

Net launchers.

Alpha-chloralose.

Repellents

None are currently registered. (Editor's note: Methyl anthrnaliate and anthriquonone are available). 

Toxicants

None are registered.

Trapping

Not allowed.

Decoy traps may be useful around orchards or livestock facilities. Proper care for trap and decoy birds is necessary.

Shooting

Hunting is the preferred method of reducing localized populations, where safe and legal. Hunting has a strong repellent effect.

Killing under special permit is advised only in extreme situations.

Other Methods

Destruction of nests and eggs helps to slow down local population growth.

Editors

Scott E. Hygnstrom; Robert M. Timm; Gary E. Larson

Prevention and Control of Wildlife Damage Logo 1994

PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF WILDLIFE DAMAGE — 1994

Cooperative Extension Division Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Nebraska -Lincoln

United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Animal Damage Control

Great Plains Agricultural Council Wildlife Committee

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