MAGPIES

Thomas C. Hall Fig. 1. North American magpie (Pica pica)
Wildlife Biologist
USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services
7104 Bellrose Aveneu, NE
Olympia, WA 98502

For additional information click Magpies

Fig. 1. North American magpies; (a)Black-billed magpie Pica pica; (b) Yellow-billed magpie, P.nuttalli

Damage Prevention and Control Methods

Exclusion

Keep young poultry, poultry nests, and vulnerable livestock in covered fenced pens.

Netting can be used to protect small areas and valuable crops.

Habitat Modification

Remove nests of offending magpies that are raiding poultry farms.

Remove low brush and roost trees in areas where damage is excessive.

Frightening

A frightening program using pyrotechnics, scarecrows, and propane cannons in conjunction with human presence is effective for magpies in most damage situations, especially for roosts and crops.

Repellents

None are registered

Toxicants

None are registered.

Trapping

Modified Australian crow and circular-funnel traps can be used to help protect heavily damaged crops from a large local population. Proper care of traps and decoy birds is necessary.

Use No. 0 and 1 padded-jaw pole traps to take a few offending individuals.

Check local, state, and federal laws before trapping.

Shooting

Shooting magpies can eliminate damage from a few offending birds and will increase the effectiveness of a frightening program. Shotguns are recommended for most shooting.

Editors

Scott E. Hygnstrom; Robert M. Timm; Gary E. Larson

Prevention and Control of Wildlife Damage Logo 1994

PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF WILDLIFE DAMAGE — 1994

Cooperative Extension Division Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Nebraska -Lincoln

United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Animal Damage Control

Great Plains Agricultural Council Wildlife Committee

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