EAGLES

Bart W. O’Gara
Research Biologist (retired)
US Fish and Wildlife Service
Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit
The University of Montana
Missoula, Montana 59812

Additional Eagle Control Information

 Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)Fig. 1. Left, Bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus; right, golden eagle, Aquila chrysaetos

Damage Prevention and Control Methods

Exclusion

Keep livestock in buildings or in pens.
Fences alone are ineffective.

Cultural Methods and Habitat Modification

Use brushy and wooded pastures to reduce exposure of livestock.
Increase human activity near sheep and goat herds—herding.
Change lambing and kidding seasons.
Confine ewes in sheds during lambing and kidding periods.
Remove carrion (dead animals) in livestock pastures.

Frightening

Scarecrows may discourage eagles from using an area for a limited period of time, usually up to 3 weeks.
Guard dogs that are aggressive toward predators may repel eagles.
Hazing with aircraft has limited value and requires a written permit from the Director, US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Repellents

None are registered.

Toxicants

Toxicants are not permitted for eagle control.

Trapping and Snaring

Limited live capture and transplanting of eagles is conducted under permit by the USFWS or USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services.

Shooting

State and federal permits are required
but are not issued.

Exclusion

To protect flower seedlings and home vegetable gardens, grow plants under frames covered with wire or plastic netting.

Editors

Scott E. Hygnstrom; Robert M. Timm; Gary E. Larson

Prevention and Control of Wildlife Damage Logo 1994

PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF WILDLIFE DAMAGE — 1994

Cooperative Extension Division Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Nebraska -Lincoln

United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Animal Damage Control

Great Plains Agricultural Council Wildlife Committee

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